PDA

Visualizza la versione completa : focus fusion



francescoG1
10-10-2007, 11:26
Voi che né pensate <a href="http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Focus_Fusion#Google_Tech_Talks" target="_blank">focus fusion 1</a> <a href="http://www.pureenergysystems.com/news/2005/11/02/9600199_Focus_Fusion/index.html#Comparison_of_Focus_Fusion_to_the_Tokam ak" target="_blank">focus fusion 2</a><br><br>pare che usi anche, come polywell, la reazione H-11B però al vantaggio di essere un pò più piccolo e forse meno costoso,mi chiedevo se può essere rimpicciolito a tal punto da sustiture il motore a combustione interna.<br><br>Ciao<br>

francescoG1
10-10-2007, 12:12
Altro link <a href="http://photoman.bizland.com/lpp/business_plan.htm" target="_blank">focus fusion 3</a>.

francescoG1
11-10-2007, 20:07
Sito ufficiale <a href="http://focusfusion.org/log/index.php" target="_blank">http://focusfusion.org/log/index.php</a><br><br>modello 3D animato <a href="http://focusfusion.org/assets/animation/DPF_25c.gif" target="_blank">http://focusfusion.org/assets/animation/DPF_25c.gif</a>

Hellblow
18-10-2007, 17:15
About Focus Fusion<br>Developers, led by Eric J. Lerner, are developing Focus Fusion, a fusion process to generate electricity that is expected to be relatively cheap, highly efficient, and small enough to fit into a garage. The process which channels hydrogen-boron fuel through a plasma focusing device, uses a smaller, more elegant approach than is currently being pursued by conventional fusion researchers. This device could be fired up and shut off with the flip of a switch, with no damaging radiation, no threat of meltdown, and no possibility of explosions<br><br><b>Focus Fusion reactors are small and decentralized</b>, ideally suited for distributed power generation. Focus Fusion reactors can fit into a garage. Lawrenceville Plasma Physics (LPP) Focus Fusion project aims at developing an electric generator with a projected output of about 5 MW, sufficient for a small community. The Focus Fusion process can produce electricity directly without the need to generate steam, use a turbine or use a rotating generator. <b>The reactors are extremely compact and economical, with expected costs of &#36;300,000 apiece.</b> As the fuel is an insignificant cost, <b>electric power production is estimated at about one tenth of a cent per kWh, fifty times cheaper than current costs.</b> Because it can be shut off and turned on so easily, a bank of these could easily accommodate whatever surges and ebbs are faced by the grid on a given day, without wasting unused energy from non-peak times into the environment, which is the case with much of the grid’s energy at present. On-site personnel are not needed on a daily basis, maintenance would be rare. One technician could operate a dozen facilities by themselves.<br><br>LPP has taken major steps towards proving these reactors feasible.<br><br>In August, 2001, a small team of physicists led by Eric J. Lerner for the first time demonstrated the achievement of temperatures above one billion degrees in a plasma focus device-- high enough for hydrogen-boron reactions. This breakthrough, reported at an international scientific conference in May, 2002, took place at Texas A and M University and was funded by NASA&#39;s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.<br>In March,2003, Lerner presented new theoretical analysis , showing that the magnetic field effect, known for thirty years but little applied in fusion, could greatly reduce the cooling of the plasmas by x-ray radiation, and thus make it far easier to achieve net energy production. The presentation, made in an invited talk at the prestigious 5th Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research in Washington DC, was favorably received by some of the top fusion experts in the world.<br>In February, 2004, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics completed a preliminary simulation of plasmoids that burns proton-boron (pB11) fuel. The simulation results confirmed that net energy production is possible with a small focus fusion device.<br>Process Description<br><br><b>Focus Fusion uses a dense plasma focus (DPF) device to form a plasma of hydrogen-boron gas,</b> as described as follows, taken from the LPP website. <b>The DPF device consists of two cylindrical copper or beryllium electrodes nested inside each other. The outer electrode is generally no more than 6-7 inches in diameter and a foot long. The electrodes are enclosed in a vacuum chamber with a hydrogen-boron gas filling the space between them. The plasma focus device is shown in the figure below.</b><br><br><br><img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/0e6f80d91198ded0fffa9c686cf85bc5.gif" alt="image"><br><br><b>A pulse of electricity from a capacitor bank is discharged across the electrodes. For a few millionths of a second, an intense current flows from the outer to the inner electrode through the gas. This current starts to heat the gas and creates an intense magnetic field. Guided by its own magnetic field, the current forms itself into a thin sheath of tiny filaments; little whirlwinds of hot, electrically-conducting gas called plasma. The fuel is in the form of decaborane (H14B10), a solid at room temperature which sublimates a gas when heated to moderate temperatures of around 100 C. As in any fusion reaction, when the hydrogen nuclei (protons) and boron-11 nuclei collide at high enough velocities, a nuclear reaction occurs. In this case, three helium nuclei (also called alpha particles) are produced, which stream off in a concentrated beam, confined by powerful magnetic field produced by the plasma itself.<br><br>When the focus is used for fusion generation, collisions of the ions with each other in the dense plasmoid cause fusion reactions which add more energy to the plasmoid. This excess energy is expelled, together with the energy that went into forming the plasmoid, in the form of an ion beam. (The energy of the electron beam is dissipated inside the plasmoid to heat it.) This happens even though the plasmoid only lasts 10 ns (billionths of a second) or so, because the very high density in the plasmoid, close to solid density, make collisions very likely and they occur extremely rapidly.<br><br>The ion beam of charged particles is directed into a decelerator which acts like a particle accelerator in reverse. Instead of using electricity to accelerate charged particles they decelerate charged particles and generate electricity. Some of this electricity is recycled to power the next fusion pulse while the excess, the net energy, is the electricity produced by the fusion power plant. Some of the x-ray energy produced by the plasmoid can also be directly converted to electricity. The capacitor is pulsed on the order of 1000 times a second to keep the process operating.</b><br><br><b>While the process would not create residual radioactivity, it does give off strong x-ray emissions, which can be harnessed by a high-tech photoelectric cell for additional energy capture</b> in a process similar to a photovoltaic solar cell. There will also need to be shielding from the pulsing electromagnetic fields generated by the reactor. A layer of lead and a layer of boron shielding surrounding the reactor would be adequate protection for the focus fusion plant.<br><br>It all sounds great and has been vetted by a number of reputable experts. If it is so easy to develop, why is LPP having such a hard time getting funding? The Open Source Energy Network article implies that DOE has a NIH attitude about the project. DOE also has another magnetic containment process and an inertial fusion experiment that it is developing that are now underfunded due to comitments to the ITER project. If Focus Fusion was successful it certainly would eliminate thousands of jobs of people working on Tokamak research. It seems to me that a few million dollars spent on projects like these would be worth the risk.<br><br><a href="http://thefraserdomain.typepad.com/energy/2005/11/powered_by_chan.html" target="_blank">http://thefraserdomain.typepad.com/energy/...ed_by_chan.html</a>

francescoG1
18-10-2007, 21:26
Non ho capito se quel generatore nell&#39;immagine genera energia in eccesso e se c&#39;è qualche dipendeza, dalle dimensioni del generatore, il surplus di potenza ottenuto;questo perchè il generatore che si menziona all&#39;inizio del post di Hellblow è 1*1*3(lunghezza) metri non puo entrare in una automobile.<br><br>ciao

MetS
18-10-2007, 23:21
<div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>QUOTE</b> (francescoG1 @ 18/10/2007, 12:26)</div><div id="quote" align="left">Non ho capito se quel generatore nell&#39;immagine genera energia in eccesso e se c&#39;è qualche dipendeza, dalle dimensioni del generatore, il surplus di potenza ottenuto;questo perchè il generatore che si menziona all&#39;inizio del post di Hellblow è 1*1*3(lunghezza) metri non puo entrare in una automobile.<br><br>ciao</div></div><br>Lo dici tu, nella mia ci entra&#33;<br>MetS<br>

tecnonick
18-10-2007, 23:32
scusate, ma questo generatore sarebbe in grado di fare una fusione di boro e idrogeno sfruttando una temperatura di 1 miliardo di gradi K, come fa a sviluppare quasta temperatura con un plasma elettrico?<br><br>m, ho letto altro e ho capito, almeno credo... da quel che ho letto funzionerebbe cosi: in un ambiente di vuoto viene creato un plasma elettrico tra i perni di rame ed il cilindro interno, per via del campo magnetico che si genera il plasma tende a concentrarsi in un solo punto, molto piccolo, e in questo punto avviene la fusione dei gas, giusto? (vedendo la sequenza di foto con le varie spiegazioni sembrerebbe di si)<br><br>poi il fascio di ioni che si genera dopo la fusione viene introdotto nel solenoide e questo genra corrente....<br><br>a prima vista sembra semplice da replicare, non ho ben chiaro il discorso di come generano il plasma, non capisco il ruolo di quel condensatore (il plasma si ha con alta tensione nel vuoto, ma sto condensatore a che serve?)<br><br><span class="edit">Edited by tecnonick - 18/10/2007, 23:57</span>

Hellblow
19-10-2007, 01:02
LOl<br>provo a rispondere partendo dal principio che il generatore in questione è un&#39;applicazione dello spheromak, o meglio una evoluzione (potrei sbagliarmi).<br><br><u>Nello Spheromak:</u><br>si instaura un campo magnetico che serve ad &quot;intrappolare&quot; fra le linee di campo, in situazione di vuoto, una &quot;nuvola&quot; di plasma introdotta nel sistema.<br>Un flusso di corrente ad alta intensit&agrave; spinge la nuvola costringendola fra le linee di forza del forte campo magnetico creato in precedenza.<br>Il plasma è un conduttore ed è in particolare uno stato della materia ionizzato e quindi un plasma in movimento sotto certe condizioni è come una &quot;vera e propria corrente&quot; (oddio quanto è brutto detto cosi&#39; :S).<br>Tutto questo crea una situazione particolare sulle linee di forza flettendole e creando una forte &quot;situazione di stress&quot; delle stesse che porta alla fine ad una improvvisa riconfigurazione delle linee di forza del campo magnetico (si chiama riconnessione magnetica, ed è la causa dei getti di plasma del sole, si pensa. Quindi immaginiamo quanto può essere violenta...).<br>In tutta questa situazione viene espulsa una bolla di plasma di forma toroidale con reazioni di fusione all&#39;interno dovute allo stress a cui è stato sottoposto il plasma (avvicinamenti, collisioni ecc...).<br>Questo in breve succede nello spheromak.<br><br>Nel caso dell&#39;articolo di cui sopra sembra che il getto di plasma sia di proposito reincanalato per poi venire rallentato sottraendo energia che, a detta dell&#39;autore, è energia elettrica.<br><br>Il condensatore altro non è che un banco di condensatori per accumulare l&#39;energia necessaria al brevissimo impulso di corrente che dovrebbe dar luogo a tutto &quot;il casino&quot; <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/50d171b267ebe718c4c8b91d24759d62.gif" alt=":D"><br><br>Applicazioni? Refueling dei tokamak, propulsione spaziale, fusione nucleare.<br><br>Quanto è brutto sto disegno, vabbè:<br><br><img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/b03477b34535b4f80a3cd99657be73c9.gif" alt="image"><br><br><img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/ee8571a58fb66edf1ca9eaabacdf36ea.gif" alt="image"><br><br>Per le dimensioni, bhè, anche i condensatori credo che vorranno la loro parte&#33;<br>Comunque, credo che quel disegno sia incompleto fra l&#39;altro...(quello del mio precedente post).

tecnonick
19-10-2007, 01:24
Ok, quindi il sistema, grazie all&#39;impulso ad alta tensione con una gran quantit&agrave; di corrente che da il banco di condensatori, riesce a sviluppare per un attimo la temperatura del miliardo di gradi, in quell&#39;attimo si sviluppa la fusione e per mantenerla è quindi sufficiente apportare meno energia?<br><br>E poi, per concentrare in un solo punto il plasma è sufficiente dare queso grande impulso o è necessario utilizzare dei campi magnetici generati da qualche magnete o manualmente?<br><br>Ma quindi, volendo ipotizzare una replica, quale tensione servirebbe per innescare la reazione e quanta corrente? e in seguito per mantenerla attiva?<br><br>I condensatori che fanno: si caricano ad un certo livello di tensione accumulando una certa quantit&agrave; di corrente che dipende dalla loro capacit&agrave;, nel momento in cui la tensione ai capi del condensatore supera la soglia necessaria per far innescare il plasma nel vuoto, il sistema si attiva.<br><br>Essendo che si tratta di un piccolo reattore, presumo che questo impulso iniziale non debba essere di un gran voltaggio, anche perchè altrimenti ti servirebbero generatori di parecchi kilovolt, una caterba di condensatori in serie e una serie di protezioni contro l&#39;alta tensione che met&agrave; basta......... e quindi si avrebbe un piccolo reattore ma un grosso generatore di corrente.<br><br>Ovvio, queste sono solo mie ipotesi è.... che ne pensi?

Hellblow
19-10-2007, 10:54
Replica? L&#39;apparato costa parecchio per un comune mortale o comunque serve una conoscenza abbastanza approfondita nelle seguenti discipline:<br><br><br><br>Dunque,<br><br><div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">per concentrare in un solo punto il plasma è sufficiente dare queso grande impulso o è necessario utilizzare dei campi magnetici generati da qualche magnete o manualmente?</div></div><br>intanto sono sicuro che serva un campo magnetico oltre alla corrente, perchè altrimenti non abbiamo le condizioni per ottenere riconnessione e quindi il gettito di plasma improvviso, che causa anche lo stress nello stesso. Il campo si aggirer&agrave; sul Tesla credo...ci vorrebbe in effetti della documentazione tecnica, se trovo qualcosa la posto.<br>Io di solito quando necessito di magneti preferisco usare degli elettromagneti per poter regolare meglio l&#39;apparato su cui lavoro. Certo per campi di una certa intensit&agrave; sono preferibili i normali magneti, ma comunque ci sono molti fattori da analizzare. Ad esempio l&#39;uso di un magnete comporta un certo isolamento termico dello stesso e quindi serve qualcosa che non lo faccia scaldare troppo...un sistema di raffreddamento?<br>Sicuramente un campo elettrico è in grado di interagire con il plasma e forse è proprio il campo elettrico che genera il plasma stesso ionizzando il gas. Quindi direi che questi due elementi sono indispensabili.<br><br><div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">Ma quindi, volendo ipotizzare una replica, quale tensione servirebbe per innescare la reazione e quanta corrente? e in seguito per mantenerla attiva?</div></div><br>Il sistema dovrebbe lavorare ad impulsi essendo geometricamente e funzionalmente diverso rispetto ad un Tokamak. Infatti non c&#39;e&#39; modo di confinare il plasma se non per qualche istante, giusto il tempo di creare quel getto di plasma. A quel punto il generatore deve essere impulsato, penso dunque si tratti di un banco MARX con scarica molto rapida. Mantenerla attiva quindi è impossibile mentre è diverso il discorso legato all&#39;energia ottenuta, che sembra essere in eccesso. In questo caso si può pensare di ricaricare i banchi con l&#39;energia ottenuta. Il sistema emette se non sbaglio anche raggi x.<br>Tensione e corrente sono parametri che dipendono sicuramente anche dalla geometria del sistema e dal tipo di gas usato. Si dovrebbero calcolare in base alle specifiche.<br><br><div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">I condensatori che fanno: si caricano ad un certo livello di tensione accumulando una certa quantit&agrave; di corrente che dipende dalla loro capacit&agrave;, nel momento in cui la tensione ai capi del condensatore supera la soglia necessaria per far innescare il plasma nel vuoto, il sistema si attiva.</div></div><br>La cosa piu&#39; semplice a cui penso è un banco MARX.<br><br><div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">Essendo che si tratta di un piccolo reattore, presumo che questo impulso iniziale non debba essere di un gran voltaggio, anche perchè altrimenti ti servirebbero generatori di parecchi kilovolt, una caterba di condensatori in serie e una serie di protezioni contro l&#39;alta tensione che met&agrave; basta......... e quindi si avrebbe un piccolo reattore ma un grosso generatore di corrente.</div></div><br>Si deve ragionare in termini di elettronvolt e non di volt. La domanda in realt&agrave; credo che sia: quanta energia serve a ionizzare quella quantit&agrave; di gas fra quegli elettrodi di superficie s disposti a distanza l? Il campo elettrico deve anche accelerare il plasma? Il campo elettrico come deve interagire con quello magnetico e con il plasma?<br>E molte altre <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/ac4aaee55d963acfff655b38aa9a660f.gif" alt=":)"><br><br>Insomma il sistema in questione non è certo riproducibile per tentativi ma prima serve una buona base di conoscenze legate alla magnetoidrodinamica ed alla fisica dei plasmi. Questo come minimo...<br>Quindi se vuoi avvicinarti ad una cosa simile devi iniziare a leggere almeno un paio di libri riguardo l&#39;argomento. In rete trovi anche molta documentazione, come appunti delle lezioni nelle universit&agrave;. Ci sono un pò di integrali, rotori e calcolo vettoriale ma non sono cose troppo complesse se non ci si spinge troppo in avanti.<br><br>Dai un&#39;occhiata qui...ci vedi anche tu l&#39;analogia fra i due apparati&#39; (Focus Fusion e Spheromak, per me sono la stessa cosa o quasi).<br><img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/7ddf2564786cd4b884d98a3e39850cfa.jpg" alt="image"><br><a href="http://www.llnl.gov/str/September05/Hill.html" target="_blank">http://www.llnl.gov/str/September05/Hill.html</a>

tecnonick
19-10-2007, 11:46
M, quello che ho letto invece non parla di utilizzare magneti o elettormagneti, sembra che sia la stessa scarica di plasma ad alta intensit&agrave; a creare un campo magnetico che la induce a concentrarsi in quel punto, tra l&#39;altro non si parla in nessun punto di magnetismo, almeno cosi sembra.....<br><br>Comunque per curiosit&agrave; appena posso faccio una prova sotto vuoto con la configurazione di quel sito per vedere come si comporta il plasma in quella geometria senza aggiunta di campi magnetici, se ne varr&agrave; la pena farò un filmato.

Hellblow
20-10-2007, 01:36
<div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">This current starts to heat the gas and creates an intense magnetic field. Guided by its own magnetic field, the current forms itself into a thin sheath of tiny filaments</div></div><br>Infatti la cosa interessante è proprio la presenza di questo campo magnetico che stavolta è prodotto dalla corrente. Per questo dico che ci sono parecchie cose da capire ed il punto di partenza è lo Spheromak da cui poi si arriva al Focus Fusion. Posso sbagliarmi ovviamente, ma credo che il percorso logico sia questo..

tecnonick
20-10-2007, 10:10
Da quel che ho capito c&#39;è analogia nelle funzioni dei due apparati, ma c&#39;è una differenza netta nella forma e tipologia, perchè nel primo il campo magnetico è permanente, nel secondo si crea grazie agli impulsi ad alta tensione. Un effetto del focus è simulabile in modo molto semplice: se si prende un magnete tondo forato in mezzo (quelli degli altpralanti) e lo si ficca tra le viti e il tubo del focus, dando alta tensione nel vuoto si creano esattamente la tipologia di scariche che fano vedere loro in foto, ciòè vedi proprio i fili di plasma rotanti che partono dall&#39;esteemit&agrave; del magnete e vanno a finire nel centro, questo è dovuto proprio alla rotondit&agrave; delle linee di forza che impone il magnete, quindi la corrente le segue e il plasma si concentra nella zona centrale del magnete, questo sistema viene anche usato per fare sputering....<br><br>Ieri ho provato a fare la prima bozza del sistema, però purtroppo senza magnete la scarica parte da un perno solo(presumo il più vicino) e se ne va contro il tubo, in pratica si crea un arco nel vuoto e basta.<br><br>Ora vado a prendere un paio di cose che mi servono e vedo di migliorare la costruzione....<br><br>Però li non parla di nulla, in pratica non si sa di che materiale è il tubo, quanti volt applicano al sistema, come è pilotato, cioè è un bel rebus andare per tentativi, poi credo che per innescare un campo magnatico tale da far imprimere quella curva al plasma serva un botto e mezzo di corrente, non riusciamo a trarre qualche dato in più? purtroppo io non sono una cima in inglese e mi aiuto con il gogolo traduttore......

Hellblow
20-10-2007, 10:53
Si c&#39;e&#39; parecchia analogia...e senza conoscenze di magnetofluidodinamica non si v&agrave; molto lontani penso.<br>Posso provare a fare una ricerca nel tempo libero <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/bd6d9f3b56ffba05e962f7728e48a818.gif" alt=":)">

tecnonick
20-10-2007, 11:27
Bè il reattore abbiamo visto che non è complicato da costruire, è piccolo, 8 perni in rame, un tubo centrale(non si sa di che materiale ma presumo che vada bene in rame), quello che bisogna capire è come alimentarlo, e quanti millibar di vuoto servono. Io mi accontanterei anche di riuscire a creare il plasma che si dispone in quel modo, poi il resto si vedr&agrave;..... Purtroppo non ci sono schemi, solo quel banco di condensatori che sembrerebbe da 40uf, in serie a questo c&#39;è lo switch, quindi presumo che sui condensatori arriva alta tensione fino a caricarli del tutto e poi lo switch chiude i condensatori sull&#39;elettrodo. Se cosi fosse è ovvio che nel momento in cui chiudi il circuito arriva un bel botto di corrente sugli elettrodi, perchè mettiamo caso che la tensione ai capi dei condensatori sia di 10kv, con una capacit&agrave; di 40uF si ha un impulso molto molto forte, però questo impulso dura il tempo che impiagano i condensatori a scaricarsi, e per darne un&#39;altro serve il tempo di ricaricare i condensatori, quindi bisognarebbe capire a che frequenza arrivano gli impulsi... Però considerando le dimensioni del reattore, non credo che lavora a più di 2kv.

Hellblow
20-10-2007, 17:40
Ovvio che non è facile da dimensionare <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/dd9481d8cf7781578a0dc7ffed36ebc5.gif" alt=":)"><br>Se è la d.d.p. che deve ionizzare il gas allora a seconda del gas servir&agrave; una tensione pari ad un minimo prestabilito. Da qui si dovrebbe poi poter dimensionare il tutto...<br>Però ripeto, prima di provare ci si deve documentare bene e si devono capire i fenomeni che si innescano nel modello originale e solo dopo si può tentare una replica. Se non si fa cosi&#39; si perde solo tempo con prove &quot;a casaccio&quot; <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/dd9481d8cf7781578a0dc7ffed36ebc5.gif" alt=":)"><br>Appena ho tempo mi studio il problema per bene, promesso.

francescoG1
20-10-2007, 19:51
Scusa Hellblow mi sai dire se l&#39;eccesso di potenza generata dipende dalle dimensioni del generatore come per il polywell?<br><br>Quali potrebbero essere le alternative al H-11B sempre aneutroniche?<br><br>Non ho capito il fuzionamento del Electron Power Systems se non ho capito male è una versione modificata del Spheromak (nel post dedicato) questo quando hai tempo.<br><br>ciao

Hellblow
22-10-2007, 23:49
<div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">Scusa Hellblow mi sai dire se l&#39;eccesso di potenza generata dipende dalle dimensioni del generatore come per il polywell?</div></div><br>Sicuramente il numero di collisioni influisce sul rendimento ragion per cui una quantit&agrave; di plasma maggiore potrebbe voler dire maggiori collisioni. Servirebbero però le equazioni che governano le reazioni per capire quali parametri ed in che misura possono migliorare o peggiorare il rendimento dell&#39;apparato.<br><br><div align="center"><div class="quote_top" align="left"><b>CITAZIONE</b></div><div id="quote" align="left">Quali potrebbero essere le alternative al H-11B sempre aneutroniche?</div></div><br>Oddio non sono un fisico nucleare per cui ho parecchi limiti su queste cose (calcola che con le mie risposte rischio il linciaggio <img src="http://codeandmore.com/vbbtest/images/customimages/e54c06139aa8ce338fa0039942e54b47.gif" alt=":D">) però penso che si debbano intanto scartare gli atomi piu&#39; pesanti di B ragion per cui andiamo a cadere su un gruppo di elementi molto ristretto. D-D è da scartare perchè genera neutroni nel 50% dei casi come anche D+T (che però ha una buona resa) e T+T.<br><br>Mi viene in mente He tre + He tre che credo produca He quattro piu&#39; protoni.<br>Forse è interessante la D+He3 che produce protone ed He4. Serve He3 però.<br><br>Poi ci sarebbero le reazioni del litio forse interessanti in particolare per le energie.<br>Magari la D+Li6 potrebbe essere MOLTO interessante e credo renda piu&#39; della B ma non so se l&#39;uso di Litio crei problemi.<br>La H+B11 in realt&agrave; dovrebbe essere protone+B11 (dato che una volta ottenuto il plasma l&#39;elettrone è separato dal nucleo di H che diventa protone) e che rende meno di 10 MeV e ritorna He. In questo caso le reazioni del Li sono piu&#39; &quot;redditizie&quot; sebbene poi si debba vedere se sono fattibili e quanto costano rispetto l&#39;uso di B.<br><br>Intendi EPS?

Franco52
19-10-2009, 14:49
Un sistema alternativo a ITER, molto più economico:

Dense plasma focus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dense_plasma_focus)

francescoG1
20-10-2009, 18:51
scusa post doppio c'è gia con il titolo focus fusion....

Franco52
20-10-2009, 19:30
La novità è che è stato costruito un prototipo funzionante con 1 milione di dollari:

Slashdot Science Story | A Step Closer To Cheap Nuclear Fusion (http://science.slashdot.org/story/09/10/18/1652201/A-Step-Closer-To-Cheap-Nuclear-Fusion)

francescoG1
08-05-2010, 23:09
qui invece i risultati:http://lawrencevilleplasmaphysics.com/files/LPP_Press_Release_Oct_09.pdf anche questo può essere interessante per chi vuole la parte teorica:http://www.physicsessays.com/doc/s2005/Lerner_Transparencies.pdf

video sul concetto:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgfY_Ig9648

Franco52
09-05-2010, 21:27
Francesco
Ti andrebbe di preparare insieme un paper con la descrizione di tutti i vari progetti di reattori a fusione in progetto o in costruzione, col relativo stato di avanzamento dei lavori?

francescoG1
10-05-2010, 18:05
Francesco
di reattori a fusione in progetto o in costruzione, col relativo stato di avanzamento dei lavori?

solo la fusione "calda"? perchè il capo è già a lavoro sulla quella "fredda"....comunque non saprei sono molto impegnato...iniziamo a raccogliere materiale (aprendo un topic e da strutturare bene per non perdersi ) vediamo cosa c'è già sul forum e poi si vede cosa abbiamo e quanto sia "credibile".

Franco52
13-01-2011, 07:58
Potrebbero costruire in tre anni un impianto da 5 MW al costo di 300000 dollari:

Focus Fusion Achieves Billion Degree Confinement (http://pesn.com/2011/01/12/9501741_Focus_Fusion_achieves_1-billion-degree_confinement/)